Games We Play

All games have a start. A beginning. A go. It isn’t terribly important which game it is, whether you move by a spinner or roll of a dice, the object is to safely and effectively reach the end. Unless it’s Trivial Pursuit, then you want to reach the middle. When my daughter was born I passed Go, but I didn’t collect $200. The real game of Life started, her life.

The "start"

Realistically when she was born everything became a proverbial roll of the dice. Which foods would upset her stomach (for your information it was a lot of them), which diapers would leave to butt-reddening diaper rash, or even whether or not she would sleep longer that 45 minutes at a time during the night. With a little luck we moved on from chance to training. Our game was to anticipate her needs, and react accordingly like a sport. Now as she approaches 4 we are very much so entrenched in games. Her games, our games and the continual test of limits.

Now as she approaches 4 I am amazed at her ability to outsmart and out maneuver me. I am aware this will only get worse. We question our children time and time again with “how many apples do you see?!” or “what do YOU think will happen when you mix blue and yellow?!”. Most days I think she wonders how I passed Kindergarten based on my line of questions for her. And when the time is right they bust out a vocabulary word you didn’t know they knew, because their spinner landed on “frustrated” or “podiatrist”. Not things you expect them to say.

She jockeyed ahead. I don’t even try to let her win anymore, she is perfectly capable all on her own.

Sometimes the game is long.

I’ve never been one to say it’s all about winning. I like to play the game. I like learning new tricks to be a better player, which my daughter seems to teach me every day. Somedays she’ll best me, she will land on the short cut square and I will be playing catch up. But that’s ok.

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2 thoughts on “Games We Play

  1. “Most days I think she wonders how I passed Kindergarten based on my line of questions for her.” Ha! That’s a very funny way to think about that. I bet they do think that sometimes. Natalie is getting so grown up!

    • Awhile back my dad and I had a discussion over how she (and other kids) must think their parents have suffered some severe head trauma that causes them to not know basic skills like counting, color identification or even the simplest problem solving. It’s right up there with pretending you don’t see them for a couple laps around the house during Hide and Seek. 🙂

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